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Autumn

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Dog Shelter
Concept & Choreography: Ivar Hagendoorn
Dancer: Irene Cortina González
Music: Ben Frost, Burial

Field Study No.1
A dance installation
Concept & Choreography: Ivar Hagendoorn
Dancer: Irene Cortina González and Camille Revol
Music: John Zorn

Performance Archive

Publications

Hagendoorn, I.G. (2017). An Agile Mind in an Agile Body. In: Oxford Handbook of Improvisation in Dance (forthcoming)

Hagendoorn, I.G. (2011). Dance, Aesthetics and the Brain. "The Book". Contents. I'm still half planning to revise the manuscript for a general audience. In the meantime this is the full text of the first edition.

Hagendoorn, I.G. (2012). Zin en Onzin in de Neuroaesthetica. (Sense and Nonsense in Neuroaesthetics, in Dutch). Cultuur + Educatie 34, 96-107.

Hagendoorn, I.G. (2010). Dance, Language and the Brain. International Journal of Art and Technology, 3 (2/3), 221-234. This paper continues the dance, x and the brain theme. In this paper I take a systematic look at dance, language and the brain.

Hagendoorn, I.G. (2010). Dance, Choreography and the Brain. In: Melcher, D. and Bacci, F. [eds.], Art and the Senses. Oxford University Press, pp. 499-514.

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Blog

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In the Picture

From the Archive