Further Reading

27.05.2017

The energy expansions of evolution. A fascinating new theory of the history of life on Earth. If you don't have time to read the original article, this is a good summary of the main ideas.

The mathematics of juggling. The art of juggling has advanced significantly in recent decades, thanks in part to the mathematical study of possible patterns. I actually own a copy of the book by Burkhard Polster, The Mathematics of Juggling, referred to in the article. I once imagined doing for dance what Polster and others have done for juggling.

New experiments suggest that simple models can explain the behavior of thousands of interacting organisms. This is (another) subject that I've been interested in for years. Some of the ideas that have emerged from the study of complex systems I've applied to dance and choreography.

Can a mind can be located outside of the head? It may depend on how you define “cognition.”

Chris Ware on Saul Steinberg's view of the world. I'm afraid I won't be able to visit the Saul Steinberg retrospective at the Art Institute of Chicago, which runs from May 27 to october 29, but I've added the catalogue to my wish list.

Where oil rigs go to die. Another excellent Guardian long read.

The world is running out of sand. When I saw this headline I remembered linking to an article about the same topic. That was in October 2014. Two and a half years on and sand is still scarce.

The quantum thermodynamics revolution. As physicists extend the 19th-century laws of thermodynamics to the quantum realm, they’re rewriting the relationships among energy, entropy and information.

Kevin Kelly on the myth of a superhuman AI.

China’s epic race to avoid a food crisis.

Tim Parks on the pleasures of pessimism.

Read and weep. Alex Tizon writes about his family's slave. Do read this response to the article as well, which offers a critical perspective.