Blog | Literature

Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray

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I just finished reading Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray. It's a good read and I can highly recommend it if you haven't read it already. It is full of the witticisms that Oscar Wilde has become famous for. I wish I could remember them all to throw into a conversation. Here are some of the ones that I jotted down. Page numbers refer to the Penguin Classics edition.

"I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect." (p. 40).

"I love acting. It is so much more real than life." (p. 77)

"He says things that annoy me, he gives me good advice." (p. 55)

"No life is spoiled but one whose growth is arrested." (p. 73)

"Even now I cannot help feeling that it is a mistake to think that the passion one feels in creation is ever really shown in the work one creates. Art is always more abstract than we fancy." (p. 111)

"The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible." (p. 24)

"Good artists exist simply in what they make, and consequently are perfectly uninteresting in what they are." (p. 56)

"When we blame ourselves we feel that no one else has a right to blame us. It is the confession, not the priest, that gives us absolution." (p. 94)